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Srimathi D.K.Pattamal lighting the Kuthivillaku launching of Hamsadhwani on 18th August 1990
 
     
Shri ‘Semmangudi’at
Hamsadhwani
 
    
Shri Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer Inaugurating Hamsadhwani Music School
 
    
Mr. Ramachandran handing over a cheque For Rs. 84,000 to Hon’ CM of Maharashtra Shri Sharad Pawar for Latur earthquake
 
    
Shri T.T Vasu, President Music Academy at the inauguration of Hamsadhwani on 18th August’ 90
 
    
Shri Mukul Wasnik, Minister for Youth Affairs addressing Hamsadhwani on Shri R. Venkatraman, former President of India and N. Ram of The Hindu share the stage
 
    
Hamsadhwani felicitating Robin Singh and Sadagopan Ramesh
 
 
    
RRC visit to Sri Lanka with the PM
 
 
    
Kalaimamani Award to RRCgiven by Kalaignar
 
 
TRIBUTE
     Born on
January 1,1924

            Left for
     Heavenly Abode on
         May 24,2007

OUR BELOVED FOUNDER
Founder Secretary: R.Ramachandran

 

Hamsadhwani 27th Anniversary sponsored
                               by
Bharat Petroleum Company Limited

            
 

            

Requiem for Ramachandran  As we had noted in this column a couple of weeks ago, the most significant reason for the survival and success of Carnatic music in the culturally volatile modern world is the inherent harmony between the orthodox devotional spirit of the traditional music and the basic moral attitude of the majority of Carnatic musicians and rasikas, who never tend to lose their strong spiritual bearings in spite of all the dramatic changes occurring progressively in the whole cultural environment and in their own outlook and lifestyles.   This fundamental truth was demonstrated convincingly in a recent vocal recital given by Sudha Raghunathan at Hamsadhwani in South Chennai.  Ever since this Sabha was set up 17 years ago, there has been a consistently strong rapport between many accomplished Carnatic musicians and the permanent members of the organisation who constitute a very large and intensely receptive audience. A detailed explanation of the basic factors accounting for such a special bond can be found in the article, 'An adventure called Hamsadhwani' in the Chennai edition of the Friday Review for Dec. 8, 2006 (online archives, thehindu.com).   Sabha and Secretary   Equally impressive has been the extremely close and emotional relationship which had developed gradually between the Sabha and its founder-secretary R. Ramachandran (alias RRC).
As the institution flourished and became a predictable venue for superior performances which would become benchmarks of excellence at every level of accomplishment, the general body of members came to feel not only respect and admiration for their dynamic and genial secretary, but also gratitude and great affection.
RRC continued to be as energetic as ever even after turning 80 a few years ago, and was brimming with vitality and enthusiasm during the early months of Hamsadhwani's latest annual festival spread over the winter, spring and summer. But suppressed health problems suddenly resulted in his spending several weeks recently inside a hospital, and he did not survive the ordeal.
Even in this last distressing stage of his life, RRC felt greatly concerned about the concluding events of the music festival which he was forced to miss, just as he was anxious about his dear wife Padma and their children, without whose unlimited moral and actives   Meditative music   One of those events was Sudha Raghunathan's vocal recital, which was heard by an overflowing house with a degree of concentration which was unprecedented even by the very high standard set up by the regular Hamsadhwani audience. The musicians and the whole sabha were acutely conscious of RRC's absence, and the atmosphere was saturated with nostalgia and a worshipful spirit.
That Sudha is one of the finest Carnatic musicians today is a well-known fact which needs no repetition. But there are some occasions when even the best musicians perform better than they usually do. That's when the artists and rasikas are all supercharged with emotion and the music acquires an extremely meditative quality.
Whatever Sudha sang that evening was sublime and beautiful, but her leisurely rendering of Bhairavi and Dikshitar's kriti, 'Balagopala' deserves special mention. She distilled the essence of the raga in the alapana, neraval ('Neela Neerada Sareera...') and swaraprasthara alike and dispensed it like perfume to the audience.
The unobtrusive accompaniment provided by violinist M.P.Gopinath and percussionists P.Satish Kumar and K.V.Gopalakrishnan helped to preserve the prayerful mood.   Eternal rest   In Western church music, we come across the Latin expression, 'Requiem' , which is a solemn musical service for the repose of departed souls. Perhaps the most famous and frequently performed requiem is an unfinished masterpiece composed by Mozart in 1791 towards the tragic end of his very short life (and completed by his disciple Sussmayr later on). Though its lyrics are in obscure Latin, the soulful sound of the choruses, solo voices, organ and orchestra transcends all barriers of language and melts the hearts of sensitive listeners anywhere in the world. An English translation of just two lines figuring in the first and last verses is enough to conjure up the spiritual tenor of the whole recital: 'Grant them eternal rest, O Lord, and may perpetual light shine upon them!' It is true that as Sudha Raghunathan sang earnestly in the concert under review, RRC was still under intensive care in the hospital, and the whole gathering was praying for his speedy recovery and early return home to resume his great unfinished adventure called Hamsadhwani. But since that intense collective wish was not fulfilled by divine dispensation, we can only think of Sudha's moving recital now in retrospect as a memorable requiem for Ramachandran.

Hamsadhwani Launch August 1990  Hamsadhwani was launched on 18 August 1990 to cater to music lovers living in the Adyar area of Chennai. R. Ramachandran, a founder-member who christened it Hamsadhwani and who is also one of its secretaries, feels it has done exceedingly well in fulfilling its objective of promoting classical music and he is proud of the sabha's record in the past 10 years.   During the first three years, Ramachandran-- a former editorial staffer of The Hindu popularly known as RRC-- functioned as convenor with a 12-member committee. The sabha now has about 20 office-bearers and a strength of 900 dues-paying members (effectively 900 x 2 or 1800) belonging to any one of the three categories: patron, life member and annual member.   The Hamsadhwani programmes are by and large well attended. "There is no `all are welcome' bait for our concerts," says RRC. "We do not believe in offering `free lunch'. We believe music will then lose its value. To attend any of our programmes, one has to be a member or has to buy a daily ticket."   "We adopt a judicious blend in featuring known or promising young musicians and very senior artists. For festivals we line up all the top musicians and middle-level performers who are in the concert arena, plus extraordinary talent even if he or she is not so well-known."   Hamsadhwani has offered more than 1300 concerts in the past 10 years as part of its regular monthly programmes and festival series. It has featured as many as 1270 main Carnatic musicians and 30 main Hindustani musicians.   According to RRC the average attendance for non-festival performances in the Youth Hostel premises has been around 250. The festival concerts attract a larger audience, varying in size from 300 to 1500 persons, depending upon the popularity of the performers.   Hamsadhwani offers two or three Hindustani music recitals during 31 December and 1 January every year. "Our experience is that quite a number of Hindustani music enthusiasts in Chennai who are not our members buy tickets and a section of our own members as well demand such recitals," says RRC.   Virtually all the programmes are held in an open-air ambience in the premises of the Youth Hostel. The rains and mosquitos have been irritant factors for rasika-s, but these have not had an adverse effect on audience turnout. Says RRC: "In the last 10 years, hardly 25 concerts might have been disrupted by rain." However, in the last three years, again, arrangements have been made to hold the concerts in the Youth Hostel Hall in the event of rain. "Mosquitos were not a problem till four years ago," says RRC and adds: "The mosquito menace is not a problem peculiar to Hamsadhwani and our members are aware that it is a common feature. They do not grumble much about it. A few members bring repellants with them." However, efforts have been made to keep the mosquitoes at bay. Hamsadhwani has been undertaking massive fogging of the open-air lawn prior to the concerts, spending as much as 300 to 400 rupees a day. "Our members are appreciative of the measures we adopt to mitigate the problem. Our artists too are understanding and have not made an issue of it."   The sabha's office-bearers have plans to construct an auditorium for it once they are able to locate and procure the suitable acres of land for the purpose. The Tamil Nadu Chief Minister has reportedly given them an assurance that the Government would examine Hamsadhwani's request for land in Taramani close to Adyar. However, a beautiful stage is being built in the present premises, retaining the open-air ambience for the audience.   Hamsadhwani has also been offering various innovative programmes from time to time in order to sustain audience interest. During the last five years, musicians are asked to give a solo concert without any accompaniment on Saraswati pooja and Vijayadasami days. Quite a few musicians like Bombay Jayashri, S. Sowmya, O.S. Arun, T.M. Krishna, Sriram Parasuram, Kiranavali, S.P. Ramh, Anuradha Suresh Krishnamurthi, Suganda Kalamegham and E. Gaayathri (veena) have accepted it as a challenge and have each performed for 90 minutes. A concert by O.S. Arun and Nityasree Mahadevan, who sang Carnatic songs in Hindustani raga-s, was also very well received. "We had a rare concert by Sudha Raghunathan with a former Union Minister playing the dhamp (a big-sized khanjira) standing all the time; his tala sense was perfect," says RRC. M. Chandrasekharan (violin) gave a vocal recital with flute as accompaniment. Lalgudi G.J.R. Krishnan (C-violin) was featured with R. Visweswaran (santoor) and again, Krishnan was featured along with Shahid Parvez (H-sitar).   Hamsadhwani has organised interactive sessions wherein the audience can pose questions to the musicians. "We had an exceptionally rewarding and most effective evening of interaction between our members and Carnatic musicians N. Ravikiran and Vijay Siva. The members sent in a bewildering number of queries on music- the place of accompanists; balancing raga, swara and tala; the extent of devotion in music, etc. It was a very interesting session where not a minute was wasted and there was no digression."   When most sabha-s have problem raising resources for their programmes, how does Hamsadhwani manage?   "We have no special schemes for funding programmes," says RRC. "Our March-April festival of 70 concerts is covered sizeably by sponsorships. It is the NRI festival of 30 concerts in December that is expensive to us. We meet the cost totally from our own resources. We do not mind the expenditure because we offer happiness to NRIs who work hard on their music, what with their job pressures abroad. We appreciate that they spend enormous amount of money to come to India and the least we can do is to provide them a platform. The applicants are growing. The only thing we expect of them is to become a patron member (a one-time payment obviously); and they have responded to this request with pleasure. We remunerate them as we do for our artists. The festival has brought us immense satisfaction and earned us a distinctive reputation. We repeatedly explain how we conduct our NRI festival, wedded as we are to openness and transparency in all our activities on sponsorship and NRI festival."   Is Hamsadhwani doing anything to popularise classical music among the young?   "Yes, we are. We offer complimentary passes to students to attract them to our programmes. But the response has not been to our expectations," says RRC. "We are now attempting to take classical music to educational institutions. We organised a concert by Neyveli Santhanagopalan in Queen Mary's College and a concert by a young girl in Kola Perumal Chetty School during class hours when the turnout was 500 and 1000 respectively. We plan to continue the practice."   Hamsadhwani's latest initiative is a music school which was launched on 19 September 1999. As many as 160 students enrolled on the opening day. Classes are held in vocal music, violin, veena, flute, keyboard, mridanga and Bharatanatyam. There are 10 part-time teachers to conduct the classes which are held in the evenings in a hall facing the sea on Elliots Beach Road.   Hamsadhwani has also been contributing to charitable causes. "Even before Kargil happened, we had a Maharashtra quake relief concert by Mandolin U. Shrinivas. It was perhaps the first such effort by a music organisation and we collected 84,000 rupees," says RRC proudly.   Hamsadhwani is not a member of the Federation of City Sabhas, but its office-bearers have been invited to attend some of the meetings from time to time. Hamsadhwani has ambitious plans for the future. At the 10th Annual General Meeting held on 30 September a resolution was placed, passed and unanimously adopted to extend Hamsadhwani's field of operations beyond performing arts to include social service. Ramachandran feels the Hamsadhwani ought to take steps in the new decade to promote the well-being of its 1600 members. "Good health and nutritious food are vital to all of us. We desire to take steps to organise and run a not-for-profit, non-commercial community kitchen as well as a clinic, enlisting the services of caring medical doctors, to reestablish the family welfare system, which seems to be vanishing today, for the benefit of the Hamsadhwani family and the public at large. We will go ahead with the project and take the first steps if our members respond positively."   S. JANAKI

LALITHAA KRISHNAN  RRC's warmth reached out to draw one and all into the fold of the Hamsadhwani family.   It was a day in the early Nineties. Conversation buzzed at the mention of a new sabha called Hamsadhwani, the unanimous verdict being that the audience experience was definitely 'different.' Just how different, I realised on my first visit. For one, the venue, the spacious open grounds of the Indranagar Youth Hostel, was an oasis of calm blissfully distanced from the din of traffic and generating a distinct ambience. But it was the person behind the institution who made the real difference.   Ever ready with a welcoming smile and exuding old-world courtesy, the founder-secretary R. Ramachandran or RRC as he was popularly known, seemed to have stepped straight out of P.G.Wodehouse's idyllic world of Blandings Castle. Cumbersome formalities fell away at the tree-lined entrance as people exchanged pleasantries under the benevolent shade of RRC mama's hail-fellow-well-met bonhomie and unique warmth which reached out to draw one and all into the fold of the Hamsadhwani family.   At Hamsadhwani, the passage of seasons was marked by a characteristic flavour. Sweltering summer evenings meant the crackle of dry grass underfoot, the languid air stirred by hand-held visiris and welcome snatches of breeze that mingled with a swirl of brigas in a brilliant Hamsanadam. Come September, and the Monsoon held sway as weather forecasts dictated concert dates. Despite casting anxious glances at overcast skies, sabha regulars turned up in fair numbers to encourage young hopefuls who performed indoors. Post-monsoon, Zen enthusiasts found that the persistent whine of mosquitoes blended perfectly with a nasal nishada or dhaivatha, while insect repellents became the must-have accessory for the less tolerant.   There was more to come. In the chilly December-January air, Delhi's soirees were recreated on the dew-wet lawns, as Carnatic and Hindustani artistes wove breathtaking magic into the rich tapestry of classical music in solos and jugalbandis. These were among mama's happiest moments. "Carnatic and Hindustani music are two sides of the same coin. With an open mind, there is so much to learn from both," he often said. No music festival was complete without a Hindustani series which became a regular fixture, thanks to mama's commitment and the special relationship he shared with a galaxy of Hindustani artistes.   With each season, Hamsadhwani went from strength to strength. As did RRC mama's friendship with artistes and rasikas who found in him a man for all seasons. Much in demand as everyone's favourite confidant, he could be counted upon to lend a sympathetic ear to the concerns of culture enthusiasts. His acceptance of emerging trends without compromising on traditional values won the regard and affection of young and old alike.   Wit and wisdom   Always open to suggestions, his own were tempered by wit and wisdom. His approach was characterised by sensitivity, simplicity and quiet dignity. Not for mama the world-weary cynicism of a harried organiser. His greatest strength perhaps lay in his ability to believe in the essential goodness of human nature. Consequently, it brought out the best in people. Artistes constantly surprised themselves by raising the bar at their recitals for Hamsadhwani and espousing causes through which they could give back to society. He was especially a pillar of support to upcoming artistes with abundant talent but few networking skills, his optimism charging them with positive energy. His fascination for the spoken and the written word found eloquent expression in his speeches and articles, enlivened by anecdotes and quotes.   Finally, there was that personal touch highly perceptive observations that revealed his insight into the person beneath the persona. Mama was quick to spot literary talent and it was his timely encouragement that launched the career of many a promising writer and journalist. Mama's wide and varied interests led to absorbing discussions on music, dance, current affairs and sports, particularly cricket. He was delighted when reviewers used apt cricket parlance in a musical context.  Gentle strength  A man with a vision and a mission who translated both into reality through a gentle strength that empowered, RRC mama's greatest legacy to the world of art is Hamsadhwani. Anxious to confirm that none of the programmes scheduled should be stalled on account of his illness or absence, he was guided by the spirit of dedication and service till the very end.  RRC's passing has left a void. An emptiness in which inadequate words trail into a silence heavy with the weight of profound loss. Yet one day, the healing touch of time will ensure that this space resonates with the notes of the music he loved best the resplendent ghana ragas, Begada and of course, Hamsadhwani, the raga synonymous with the name Ramachandran. For that is what he would have wanted.- Lalithaa Krishnan  Another article  An NRI's rapport  n the demise of Hamsadhwani Ramachandran, Carnatic music has lost a valuable patron and it is a great personal loss for this writer.  I came to know of Ramachandran way back in 1998 when, on the advice of flute maestro Ramani, I approached a few sabhas in Chennai, seeking an opportunity for my mridangist son Rohan Krishnamurthy. I received no response except for a fax message from Ramachandran. The message simply said, "We want to give Rohan an opportunity. Please call me at this number."  I called him right away and he explained Hamsadhwani's life membership scheme. I agreed to become a member applauding him for his transparency.  That year Rohan made his debut in Chennai at Hamsadhwani, an event which was later going to be a landmark in his relationship with the Chennai music world. Ramachandran sought his performance in one more concert the same year and declared that Rohan will feature in at least two concerts at Hamsadhwani every year. He spread the word among his press friends asking them to take note of Rohan.  Last year, when The Hindu decided to run a story on NRI musicians, Ramachandran contacted Rohan saying, "No justice will be done to an NRI story without involving Rohan."  Ramachandran was also responsible for recommending Rohan to Bharat Kalachar which eventually conferred on him the Yuva Kala Bharathi award at a very young age.  For the past decade or so, our visits to Chennai in December were never complete without spending extended hours of brain storming with Ramachandran. "To me Rohan is a grandson I wish I had," remarked Sri Ramachandran. We were among the select few invited to his Sathabishekam.  Last year, he suggested that I take over the NRI part of Hamsadhwani's activities. Also I had a long chat with him on Rohan's and my experiences in dealing with the Chennai Carnatic music scene.  He said that Rohan had bigger missions to achieve as a cultural ambassador and take his skills to an international audience. Rohan is doing just that and the success he achieves will be the highest tribute that we can pay to this most personable soul. Ramachandran, we will miss you Sir!   Dr.R.V.Krishnamurthy
Michigan, USA

NRI Festival of Music & Dance  Mr. R. Ramachandran, due to the interest and passion to bring into the fold talented NRIs from various countries to showcase their talent in India, started the NRI Festival of Music and Dance in 1995 which is a unique music festival. An exclusive event, where we give opportunity to talent abroad, the main artist must be an NRI. What started as an 'experiment' is now assuming great importance during the Festival season. We have about 50 NRI concerts between 15th December and New Year. The response is quite satisfying with an audience of at least 150 200. This is remarkable when you consider that about 50 sabhas in the city offer 3-4 concerts daily during the December festival. Hamsadhwani is indeed proud that we have not forgotten our folks who have chosen to pursue career abroad and do our country proud. We help them to strengthen their cultural links with India

An NRI's rapport  n the demise of Hamsadhwani Ramachandran, Carnatic music has lost a valuable patron and it is a great personal loss for this writer.  I came to know of Ramachandran way back in 1998 when, on the advice of flute maestro Ramani, I approached a few sabhas in Chennai, seeking an opportunity for my mridangist son Rohan Krishnamurthy. I received no response except for a fax message from Ramachandran. The message simply said, "We want to give Rohan an opportunity. Please call me at this number."  I called him right away and he explained Hamsadhwani's life membership scheme. I agreed to become a member applauding him for his transparency.  That year Rohan made his debut in Chennai at Hamsadhwani, an event which was later going to be a landmark in his relationship with the Chennai music world. Ramachandran sought his performance in one more concert the same year and declared that Rohan will feature in at least two concerts at Hamsadhwani every year. He spread the word among his press friends asking them to take note of Rohan.  Last year, when The Hindu decided to run a story on NRI musicians, Ramachandran contacted Rohan saying, "No justice will be done to an NRI story without involving Rohan."  Ramachandran was also responsible for recommending Rohan to Bharat Kalachar which eventually conferred on him the Yuva Kala Bharathi award at a very young age.  For the past decade or so, our visits to Chennai in December were never complete without spending extended hours of brain storming with Ramachandran. "To me Rohan is a grandson I wish I had," remarked Sri Ramachandran. We were among the select few invited to his Sathabishekam.  Last year, he suggested that I take over the NRI part of Hamsadhwani's activities. Also I had a long chat with him on Rohan's and my experiences in dealing with the Chennai Carnatic music scene.  He said that Rohan had bigger missions to achieve as a cultural ambassador and take his skills to an international audience. Rohan is doing just that and the success he achieves will be the highest tribute that we can pay to this most personable soul. Ramachandran, we will miss you Sir!  Dr.R.V.Krishnamurthy
Michigan, USA

An adventure called Hamsadhwani   M.V. RAMAKRISHNAN
The curtain goes up on the NRI music and dance festival on December 10.  Once upon a time, say 40 or 50 years ago, lovers of Carnatic music in Chennai (sorry, Madras!) had no great difficulty in reaching and returning home from prestigious sabhas like Krishna Gana Sabha and Thyaga Brahma Gana Sabha in T.Nagar, Mylapore Fine Arts Club and Rasika Ranjani Sabha in Mylapore, and Parthasarathy Swami Sabha in Triplicane, wherever they were living in the relatively small city, and whether they had a car or caught a bus or rode a scooter or bicycle.  But today, there's a very different scenario. The city has expanded greatly, and the traffic has grown beyond tolerable limits even as parking space in important locations has shrunk abominably. As a result, although the leading sabhas of the good old days still retain their prestige, they normally fail to attract many visitors from all over the city, thus losing their metropolitan character and more or less becoming local landmarks in their ancient neighbourhoods.   It is true that during the winter months, when a roaring tidal wave from the Carnatic Ocean hits this city, the venerable venues do attract music lovers from distant localities as well as other cities in India and abroad, who take extraordinary trouble to ensure their attendance. But in spite of all the elan and excitement of the season, many rasikas in Chennai find it impossible to overcome the transport problem and visit the legendary sabhas which never fail to stir nostalgic memories of the intense past musical experiences.   Proliferation of sabhas   The natural sequel to the problem has been the progressive proliferation of sabhas and other cultural institutions all over the city, organising carnatic music as well as classical dance and Tamil drama.   Some of them have achieved considerable prominence and popularity, and owe their success to the vigorous and effective initiative taken by resourceful voluntary organisers. A helpful factor in recent years has been the consistent interest taken by some leading business houses in promoting the performing arts by sponsoring specific events or offering overall financial aid.   The most innovative and impressive among such new organisations is Hamsadhwani, which functions in a breezy, semi-outdoor venue with surprisingly fine acoustics on the spacious grounds of the Youth Hostel in Indira Nagar. The place is easily accessible to music lovers in the vast residential localities south of the Adyar river and along the east coast, because the traffic in these sectors is not too troublesome, reliable bus routes are not far away, and there is plenty of parking space along the wide uncrowded avenues near the hostel.   Mutual response   Established in 1990, Hamsadhwani has already acquired the status of a leading sabha in Chennai, with the largest number of regular members, and very substantial funds flowing from its own resources as well as contributions from certain reputed commercial concerns. It has achieved this remarkable success because it is a convenient source of excellent music for so many adjacent music-starved residential sectors, and faces no serious competition in its own vast territory.   In fact, the grateful audience is usually so enthusiastic and attentive that even the most distinguished musicians often respond emotionally, and find it a joyful experience to perform in this simple forum.   True to its character as a unique phenomenon, Hamsadhwani does not add the usual kind of programmes to the frenzied mega-gala in the winter season, but organises an NRI music and dance festival in December and a Hindustani music week in January. These are followed by a long series of Carnatic music concerts till the end of March, featuring prominent musicians in the weekends and promising ones on other days. This marathon is concluded in April with a week-long festival of Tamil drama.   The NRI festival provides a rare and authentic ambience and a knowledgeable audience for talented, Non-Resident Indians to perform the native arts they take such great pains to learn and practise in the foreign countries, where they live.   The only conditions are that they should have attained a reasonably good standard, and must join the organisation as patron-members. The intricate pros and cons of this expedient exchange call for a separate review; let us merely note here that it adds an unusual dimension to Hamsadhwani's activities.

Hamsadhwani Music School   Hamsadhwani's Music School was 'born' with appropriately the doyen of Carnatic music Sri Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer inaugurated the school. We were pleased that in the first year itself we had about 160 students on the roll. The response has been more that what we expected. We teach Vocal, instruments like Violin, Flute, Veena, Mridangam and even Key board. And we have students learning Bharata Natyam also.

Distinguished Citizen Awars   Hamsadhwani has initiated 2 awards that are given every year  1. Hamsadhwani Citizen of the Year Award given to an individual for their exceptional contribution to the welfare of society. The past awardees have been   Year        Awardee
2004       Dr. V. Shanta                    Cancer Hospital
2005       B. Nirmal                           Founder, EXNORA
2006       Dr. S.S. Badrinath             Founder, Shankar Netralaya
2007       Dr. M.S. Swaminathan      Agricultural Scientist
2008       Dr. M.S. Ananth                 Director IIT Madras
2009       S. Krishnaswamy               Film Maker
2010       Y.G. Parthasarathy            Educationist
2011       K. Balachander                   Film Director & Producer
2012       Dr. Meena Muthiah            Philanthropist & Educationist
2013       K. Parasaran                      Former Attorney General
2014       Dr. A. Sivathanu Pillai       Space Scientist
2016       R.K. Raghavan                    Former Director of CBI  2. The Hamsadhwani R. Ramachandran Award of Excellence . The award has been instituted in The year 2007 in the memory of R. Ramachandran the founder secretary of Hamsadhwani. This is given to an Organisation that render selfless service to society in various areas like education, healthcare, provide shelter to elders or under privileged, assistance to differently abled etc. The past awardees have been   Year        Awardee Organisation
2008       The Hindu                   
2009       The Amar Seva Sangham                          
2010       The Voluntary Health Services (VHS)             
2011       Vishranti    
2012       Akshya Trust, Madurai                 
2013       The Madras Sanskrit College              
2014       Ramana Sunritya Aalaya (RASA)           
2015       Sruti Magazine                  
2016       Ramakrishna Math, Chennai           
2017       Kalki Group of Publications